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Category: Full Spectrum Preparedness

The Full Spectrum Preparedness Doctrine is a comprehensive approach to preparedness that organizes preparedness efforts into ten interrelated foundations: The Doctrine of Full Spectrum Preparedness is applicable to all preppers at all preparedness levels in all geographic areas and was created because other preparedness ‘programs’ are too dogmatic, too simple, too complex, too expensive to implement, too focused on a particular type of calamity, too reliant on situations that aren’t universal (owning a farm, having unlimited money or unlimited storage capability) or a combination of the above. The ten overlapping, mutually supportive preparedness fundamentals are: Security Preparedness: Those items, knowledge, skills and people necessary for your protection and security. Includes all aspects of security including, but not limited to physical security, operational security (stealth, keeping a low profile) as well as self-defense. Shelter & Clothing Preparedness: Shelter, clothing and those items and skills necessary to protect you from the elements. Health, Fitness and Medical Preparedness: This fundamental includes everything needed to keep you and your family healthy that’s not more appropriate to another fundamental. This includes everything related to first aid, medicines, medical care, sanitation, and fitness. Transportation Preparedness: Those skills and items necessary to support your family’s transportation needs. This may be the wheelbarrow you require to haul water or the vehicle you plan to use to bug out. Family & Community Support: These are the family and community networks and ties that keep you sane, focused and help you plug any holes you discover in your preps after it’s too late. This also includes certain items necessary for family harmony as well like a deck of cards or perhaps your child’s favorite stuffed animal. Food Preparedness: Food, food preparation and the knowledge and skills necessary to acquire and food. Financial Preparedness: These are your savings, stored wealth and the skills that allow you to make a living. Water Preparedness: Water, water purification and the knowledge and skills necessary to acquire safe, potable water as well as water that’s safe to use for sanitation purposes. Communications Preparedness: Those skills and items necessary to maintain communications within your family or group as well as with the outside would. Cognitive, Mental & Spiritual Preparedness: This is the most important fundamental. This fundamental incorporates the ‘will to live’ with the ability to adapt and can be significantly reinforced by the belief in a higher power.


Don’t Just Stand By And Watch – Quote

Do something… Hiding, or sitting back, is not going to accomplish anything. And the gunman would’ve been successful if my friend Spencer had not gotten up. So I just want that lesson to be learned going forward, in times of, like, terror like that, please do something. Don’t just stand by and watch. Spencer Stone, U.S. Airman and recipient of France’s Legion d’honneur for taking down a rifle wielding Jihadi on one of France’s high speed trains Source: American train attack heroes awarded France’s highest honor For his warrior spirit and frankly for ignoring DOD policies that tell service members to hide and barricade themselves during an active shooter situation, Airman Stone along with National Guardsman Alek Skarlatos, their longtime friend Anthony Sadler and British businessman Chris Norman are the latest inductees into Prepography‘s Wall of Honor.   FacebookPinterestGoogleRedditTwitterTumblrEmailPrintPocketMoreLinkedInLike this:Like...

Marriage Is Like The Army – Quote

Marriage is like the Army; everyone complains, but you’d be surprised at the large number of people who re-enlist. James Garner FacebookPinterestGoogleRedditTwitterTumblrEmailPrintPocketMoreLinkedInLike this:Like...

5 Tips on Bugging Out Into The Woods

If you have spent any time at all in the on-line Prepper community, you have no doubt seen discussion from people who have plans for bugging out into the woods and living off the land in the event of a crisis. These discussions lay out optimistic projections of grabbing a BOB and hoofing it into the woods. There, the authors will hunt and forage in order to survive whatever crisis they are escaping. The reality of bugging out into the woods will most likely be considerably different than those author’s fantasies. We’ve been discussing these wilderness fantasies recently and have come up with 5 tips on bugging out into the woods. Bugging Out Into The Woods 1) Have A Plan, Otherwise You Are Just A Refugee. Having a vague plan of bugging out “into the woods;” essentially taking an extended camping trip, is not a real plan. We were all raised on movies where the city slicker was dropped unexpectedly into the wilderness and through some difficulties learned to live off the land but there are very few people who have the necessary skills to survive this kind of life long term.  Even Dick Proenneke had a plan that included regular resupply from civilization.  Being part of some mass exodus with no prepared location waiting for you makes you a refugee, no matter how well equipped you are. If you own the property you are bugging out to a plan might include building shelter ahead of time and laying in an extensive collection of prepositioned caches. If you don’t own your property your choices are retreating to public lands with every other mountain-man wannabe or trespassing on other people’s lands.  With resources running thin either situation can get you in legal trouble if there’s still some rule of law or worse.  If your plan includes unnecessary trespass and theft then you aren’t...

Top 10 Thoughts For Better SHTF Nutrition

Providing better nutrition is always a concern, even in the best of times. In a SHTF scenario, it can literally mean the difference between life and death. Food security/preparedness is one of the 10 tenants of the Full Spectrum Preparedness Doctrine, and providing better nutrition is a key component of that.  In the interests of helping you improve your food preparedness and security through good times and bad, Prepography presents the Top 10 Thoughts for Better SHTF Nutrition: Top 10 Thoughts for Better SHTF Nutrition 1.  Think Chicken & Eggs – It doesn’t matter which came first as Chickens provide the cheapest animal protein, pound for pound, to produce. Their meat is low-fat, and high in nutrients. They also produce eggs, which provide additional nutritional benefits. Chicken meat and eggs can be prepared a variety of ways for consumption and storage. Even egg shells can be boiled and finely ground then added to food for additional protein. 2.  Think With Your Guts – Actually, think about guts.  Liver, kidneys, hearts and even blood are can be very nutritious. Many people turn their noses up at them for a variety of reasons and liver was considered to be dog food until the Great Depression but there are many ways to prepare them to make delicious meals.  One of the axioms in food prepping is that if you don’t eat it normally you won’t eat it in times of crisis so give some of these other protein sources a try with the following recipes. Liver Recipes Kidney Recipes Heart Recipes Cooking with Blood Note: 1. These are ‘good times’ recipes to introduce you these foods which can also be prepared in more austere conditions. 2. Those with certain medical conditions should avoid organ meats. Consult your physician about dietary restrictions for any chronic medical conditions you have. 3.  Think Beans, Peas,...

Sugar Maple Identification – Infographic

With tree tapping season upon us here at The Hermitage I’ve been reading up on sugaring and tree tapping.  We’ve yet to do a real tree census on the retreat and haven’t identified any suitable maple trees yet but have already found a number of trees that can be tapped. I’m going to try tapping one of my Sycamore trees later this week.  In addition to the Maple (Rocky Mountain, Canyon/Big Tooth, Boxelder, Norway, Red, Silver, Black and of course Sugar) and Sycamore trees there are a number of other North American trees that can produce syrup yielding sap including Ironwood, Birch (River, Black, Yellow and Paper), English Walnut, Hazelnut, Black Walnut, Butternut/White Walnut…did I miss any? Anyway, today’s infographic on Sugar Maple Identification is brought to us by Ohio Thoughts… FacebookPinterestGoogleRedditTwitterTumblrEmailPrintPocketMoreLinkedInLike this:Like...

10 Steps To Sharpen A Chainsaw

My recent Prepography article “8 Tips For Using A Chainsaw” gave the basics on using a chainsaw. Having a sharp chain is very important for safety as well as productivity. Chains will dull very quickly, especially if cutting an extremely hard wood such as hedge. Knowing how to sharpen a chainsaw is an important skill to have. Not only will it increase the effectiveness of your efforts, it will save you money to boot because you’ll use fewer saw lubricating oils and won’t have to pay someone else to do it for you. How To Sharpen A Chainsaw In 10 Steps 1) Determine Your Chainsaw’s Gauge – You will need a rotary grindstone or chainsaw file that matches the size of the chain’s teeth. You can also buy a chainsaw sharpening kit that has everything you need in it, like the one to the right.  Typical sizes are 3/16, 5/32 and 7/32 of an inch in diameter. 2) Thoroughly Clean Your Chain – Use a brush and solvent to clean dirt, dust and debris off the chain. 3) Inspect Your Chain For Damage – Look for chipped, broken, or bent teeth. These will make a chain dangerous to use. If a tooth is worn short, it is at risk of breaking during operation, which is extremely dangerous to the operator. Replace any chain that is worn or damaged. 4) Place Your Saw On A Solid Surface – For safe and accurate filing your saw must be stable and the blade firmly supported. Use a vise to clamp the bar while allowing the chain to rotate freely is the best option. 5) Locate Your Start Point – The lead cutter on a chain is the shortest cutting tooth on the chain. If you can’t locate it, just take a permanent marker and mark a tooth as the starting point. 6)...

Nuts

Today is the 70th Anniversary of the most intriguing series of correspondence in military history.  On December 22nd, 1944 the 101st Airborne Division, under the acting command of Brigadier General Anthony McAuliffe, found itself in defense of Bastogne, Belgium and encircled by a greatly superior German force after the German surprise attack known as the Battle of the Bulge.  The enemy commander sent the BG McAuliffe the following: To the U.S.A. Commander of the encircled town of Bastogne. The fortune of war is changing. This time the U.S.A. forces in and near Bastogne have been encircled by strong German armored units. More German armored units have crossed the river Our near Ortheuville, have taken Marche and reached St. Hubert by passing through Hompre-Sibret-Tillet. Libramont is in German hands. There is only one possibility to save the encircled U.S.A. troops from total annihilation: that is the honorable surrender of the encircled town. In order to think it over a term of two hours will be granted beginning with the presentation of this note. If this proposal should be rejected one German Artillery Corps and six heavy A. A. Battalions are ready to annihilate the U.S.A. troops in and near Bastogne. The order for firing will be given immediately after this two hours term. All the serious civilian losses caused by this artillery fire would not correspond with the well-known American humanity. The German Commander. According to the accounts from those present when McAuliffe was given the German message, he read it, crumpled it into a ball and threw it in the trash while exclaiming, “Aw, nuts”.  After a short deliberation on what the official response should be, McAuliffe and his staff accepted the suggestion of Lieutenant Colonel Harry Kinnard that BG McAuliffe’s first response summed up the situation pretty well. To the German Commander. NUTS! The American Commander Of course, the...

Cogitation – The Woosification Of American Men

A buddy turned me onto the Creek Stewart survivalist show called Fat Guys In The Woods on the Weather Channel.  It’s not exciting, it’s not fancy, it’s not high drama but it is a great show to learn about bushcraft and the woosification of American men. Each episode revolves around three couch potatoes who are stuck in a rut of some form and need to make a change in their life.  Creek’s goal is to help his rotund padawans build self confidence to move forward in their lives outside the woods.  Creek’s approach is similar to that used by Outward Bound but revolves primarily around primitive wilderness skills.  The guys enter the woods and Stewart walks them through shelter building, food acquisition as well as water acquisition and purification.  By the end of their week in the woods the fat guys have developed some basic bushcraft skills which they get to put to the test by striking out on their own for the final day and night. For thousands of years, man lived wild and our triumph over mother nature defined who we were. We were rugged; we were strong and as we evolved our ingenuity led to towering achievements. We secured our place at the top of the food chain and now we have the waistline to prove it… Get off the couch and come out to the woods. Creek Stewart The show seems to go out of their way to pick guys that haven’t spent a lot of time outside or in primitive environments and most of the fat guys seem to rise to the occasion and learn important life lessons but what amazes me is how many of these grown men fall to pieces when it comes time to kill game to eat.  Whatever happened to Dad and Grandpa taking their young men into the woods and teaching them where their...

First Aid For Frostbite In 5 Steps

Winter is almost upon us and freezing temperatures are already here.  Part of the Full Spectrum Preparedness Doctrine is recognizing the dangers we may face and being able to address them.  One of the major dangers in cold weather is frostbite.  Knowing first aid for frostbite is an important first aid skill to know once freezing temperatures arise. What is frostbite? Frostbite is a medical condition that results from the freezing of the body’s tissue. It usually affects the parts of the body that are farthest from the heart and large patches of exposed skin. Frostbite is characterized by the constriction of the skin, as blood is shunted to the body’s core in an attempt to maintain body temperature. The affected tissue freezes, and ice crystals form inside the body’s cells. As the tissue thaws, symptoms range from pain and itching (1st degree) to deep tissue damage (3rd and 4th degree), which can result in the necessity to amputate or excise dead tissue. Death can occur if left untreated, so it is important to seek medical assistance and know first aid for frostbite. Treating Frostbite In 5 Steps. Step One Get out of the cold. If you can not, do not start treating frostbite until you reach safety. Step 2 Before treating frostbite, remove any jewelry, as swelling will occur as the tissue thaws. Step 3 Submerge the affected area in body-temperature water. Change the water as it cools down. Try to keep the water at a constant temperature. Step 4 Use body heat for treating mild cases of frostbite, if water is not available. Step 5 Wrap damaged tissue in sterile bandages to protect the affected area from infection. Wrap affected digits (fingers and toes) in individual wrappings. Remember in any case of frostbite, seek professional medical attention as soon as possible. WARNING!!! When treating frostbite, DO NOT place...

8 Tips For Using A Chainsaw

Using a chainsaw to cut wood is an essential part of maintaining a homestead and providing your home with an alternative heating fuel source. Both of the aforementioned are integral parts of the Full Spectrum Preparedness Doctrine. Whether you are an experienced chainsaw user, or a novice starting out, any time of year is a good time to cut wood.  In my book, now is the best time, though. Late fall is upon us, and we’ve had our first hard freeze. This is for a variety of reasons: It’s not too hot, or too cold; making cutting wood much more comfortable. Most of the things bite, sting and make you itch have been killed off with the first freeze. The small underlying vegetation and leaves have died back, or fallen, making it easier to move around and get to trees that will be cut. With this in mind, here are Prepography‘s: 8 Tips For Using A Chainsaw 1) Select a model that is dependable , that you can handle, and is the right size for what you are cutting. Chainsaws come in a variety of sizes, from a number of manufacturers. Like anything else you buy, “you get what you pay for”. There are some inexpensive reliable models, as well as some more expensive unreliable ones. Consumer reviews are great at helping you decide which one is best quality and best suited to your needs. Chainsaws range from small electric models with 12 inch bar blades, suitable only for cutting small limbs, to huge industrial ones with large bow blades used for lumberjacking. A novice would not want to start with one of the latter, as it would be too unwieldy for them. Conversely, they may find the smaller one incapable of doing what they want. As a rule of thumb, you should be able to comfortably lift the...

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