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Category: First Aid


First Aid For Frostbite In 5 Steps

Winter is almost upon us and freezing temperatures are already here.  Part of the Full Spectrum Preparedness Doctrine is recognizing the dangers we may face and being able to address them.  One of the major dangers in cold weather is frostbite.  Knowing first aid for frostbite is an important first aid skill to know once freezing temperatures arise. What is frostbite? Frostbite is a medical condition that results from the freezing of the body’s tissue. It usually affects the parts of the body that are farthest from the heart and large patches of exposed skin. Frostbite is characterized by the constriction of the skin, as blood is shunted to the body’s core in an attempt to maintain body temperature. The affected tissue freezes, and ice crystals form inside the body’s cells. As the tissue thaws, symptoms range from pain and itching (1st degree) to deep tissue damage (3rd and 4th degree), which can result in the necessity to amputate or excise dead tissue. Death can occur if left untreated, so it is important to seek medical assistance and know first aid for frostbite. Treating Frostbite In 5 Steps. Step One Get out of the cold. If you can not, do not start treating frostbite until you reach safety. Step 2 Before treating frostbite, remove any jewelry, as swelling will occur as the tissue thaws. Step 3 Submerge the affected area in body-temperature water. Change the water as it cools down. Try to keep the water at a constant temperature. Step 4 Use body heat for treating mild cases of frostbite, if water is not available. Step 5 Wrap damaged tissue in sterile bandages to protect the affected area from infection. Wrap affected digits (fingers and toes) in individual wrappings. Remember in any case of frostbite, seek professional medical attention as soon as possible. WARNING!!! When treating frostbite, DO NOT place...

First Aid To Clear Object Stuck In Throat – The Army Way

The Army does a good job of breaking down complex procedures into digestible tasks but the Army doesn’t always call things by the same name as civilians…civilians would call this the Heimlich Maneuver but the Army calls it First Aid To Clear Object Stuck In Throat.  Links have been added to facilitate further reading or research. Task Number: 081-COM-1003 Task Title: Perform First Aid to Clear an Object Stuck in the Throat of a Conscious Casualty Task Type: Individual Proponent: Task Data Conditions: You see a conscious casualty who is having difficulty breathing because something is stuck in his throat. This iteration should NOT be performed in MOPP. Standards: Clear the object from the casualty’s throat by giving abdominal or chest thrusts until the casualty can talk and breathe normally, you are relieved by a qualified person, or the casualty becomes unconscious requiring mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. Safety Notes: In a training environment, leaders must perform a risk assessment in accordance with FM 5-19, Composite Risk Management. Leaders will complete a DA Form 7566 COMPOSITE RISK MANAGEMENT WORKSHEET during the planning and completion of each task and sub-task by assessing mission, enemy, terrain and weather, troops and support available-time available and civil considerations, (METT-TC). Note: During MOPP training, leaders must ensure personnel are monitored for potential heat injury. Local policies and procedures must be followed during times of increased heat category in order to avoid heat related injury. Consider the MOPP work/rest cycles and water replacement guidelines IAW FM 3-11.4, NBC Protection, FM 3-11.5, CBRN Decontamination. Environment: Environmental protection is not just the law but the right thing to do. It is a continual process and starts with deliberate planning. Always be alert to ways to protect our environment during training and missions. In doing so, you will contribute to the sustainment of our training resources while protecting people and the...

Treating Nosebleeds The Army Way

Today we present a short excerpt from the U.S. Army Medical Department Center & School’s Subcourse MD 0547 Edition 100, Eye, Ear and Nose Injuries.  This is the procedure that the Army trains its medical specialists to use in treating epistaxis, AKA nosebleeds.  Read on and learn the causes of nosebleeeds and how to treat nosebleeds the Army way.  Make sure to seek medical attention if the bleeding persists. Treat A Patient With Epistaxis (Nosebleed) GENERAL A casualty suffering with epistaxis (nosebleed) should be treated immediately.  Prolonging treatment could cause an excessive loss of blood that could develop into a more serious situation.  This lesson will provide you with the causes of and the treatment for epistaxis [nosebleed].  CAUSES OF EPISTAXIS Bleeding from the nose can be caused by the following conditions: Injury from trauma to the face or head and/or picking of the nose. Drying and crusting of nasal mucosa. Diseases, including hypertension and local infection such as sinusitis or rhinitis. TREAT EPISTAXIS Most epistaxis can be treated successfully by the following procedures. Tell patient not to breathe through his nose and not to blow his nose. Tell patient to sit facing you. Tell patient to tilt his head slightly forward. Tell patient to pinch the fatty part of his nose [for] 5 to 10 minutes. Apply cold compress (if available) to the bridge of the nose. EXCESSIVE LOSS OF BLOOD NOTE:    If there is a significant amount of bleeding and there is a possibility of shock, the patient should be evacuated or referred for further treatment. (Refer to 081-833-0047, Initiate Treatment for Hypovolemic Shock) Obtain a short history of the patient to include cause, duration, previous incidents of nosebleed, and an estimation of the amount of blood loss. Obtain and record vital signs. FacebookPinterestGoogleRedditTwitterTumblrEmailPrintPocketMoreLinkedInLike this:Like...

Hypothermia

 Andrew’s Note:  Like much of the nation we’ve been experiencing a cold snap recently so today’s survival lesson is an extract from FM 21-76-1, the U.S. Army manual on Survival, Evasion & Recovery June 1999, Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.  This extract deals with Treating Hypothermia until you can get the victim to proper medical care.  Stay warm! Hypothermia Is a progressive injury. •Intense shivering with impaired ability to perform complex tasks leads to— ••Violent shivering, difficulty speaking, sluggish thinking go to— •••Muscular rigidity with blue, puffy skin; jerky movements go to— ••••Coma, respiratory and cardiac failure. Protect victim from the environment as follows: •Remove wet clothing. •Put on dry clothing (if available). •Prevent further heat loss. ••Cover top of head. ••Insulate from above and below. •Warm with blankets, sleeping bags, or shelter. •Warm central areas before extremities. ••Place heat packs in groin, armpits, and around neck. ••Avoid causing burns to skin. CAUTION: Handle hypothermia victim gently.  Avoid overly rapid rewarming which may cause cardiac arrest. Rewarming of victim with skin-to-skin contact by volunteer(s) inside of a sleeping bag is a survival technique but can cause internal temperatures of all to drop. FacebookPinterestGoogleRedditTwitterTumblrEmailPrintPocketMoreLinkedInLike this:Like...

The Most Important Item In Your First Aid Kit

Andrew’s Note:  Today we present an article on The Most Important Item In Your First Aid Kit by guest author, Frank Nielson. In the event of an injury, natural disaster or more serious type emergency one of the basic staples of your gear will be your first aid kit. With such a wide variety of choices available from small first aid pouches for your car to expedition sized kits the size of backpacks deciding on the best first aid kit can be overwhelming.  In too many cases, the decision defaults to two just two factors, the size of the first aid kit and the price of the first aid kit.  Don’t forget that the most important tool in your first aid kit is the one between your ears along with the skills you impart to your body through training and practice. Before you dismiss this article and think “I’ve already taken care of that” let me ask you this. Have you invested in developing the cognitive tools you need to put your first aid kit to use?  I’m speaking of the training and mental preparation you’ll need to know what tools, techniques and procedures to use…and the willingness to do so. Hopefully, by this article’s end you will agree that the most important tool in your first aid kit is knowledge. Nearly any over the counter first aid kit will work fine for minor non-life threatening injuries. But should you get caught up in an extended disaster, experienced, trained medical personnel may be unavailable or several days away. If you ever find yourself in such a position, you will thank yourself for following the sage advice “plan for the worst and hope for the best.” This article is not intended to lead you by the hand with every bandage and pill you should include in your first aid kit. There...

QuikClot Saves Lives

Performance Systems QuikClot Combat Gauze, 3″ x 4 Yards Features of the Performance Systems QuikClot Combat Gauze: QuikClot® Combat Gauze™ provides the ultimate in stopping power for traumatic wounds; requiring no mixing, measuring or heat – just open and apply. Easy to pack, it stays cool under pressure and remains ultra flexible while conforming to any shape or size wound, and removes easily without effect. As the Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care’s #1 choice for first line treatment for life-threatening hemorrhage; QuikClot® Combat Gauze™ is the essential item in every prepper’s medical kit.  Simply put, QuikClot saves lives! Retail Price:$68.49 Your Price:$47.88 You Save:$20.61 (30%) FacebookPinterestGoogleRedditTwitterTumblrEmailPrintPocketMoreLinkedInLike this:Like...

Improvised Litter Construction

Andrew’s Note:  One of the things I love about being in the Army is that there’s a manual for how to accomplish just about any task you can imagine.  The problem in applying Army solutions to Prepper problems is that our Army is so well supplied and funded that it has world class specialty equipment to accomplish any task that even the most well-heeled prepper can’t hope to match.  There are other Army manuals though that can fill that gap, these manuals and parts of manuals explain how to improvise many of the tools and equipment we use in the Army.  These improvised tools, techniques and procedures can often be of use to the preparedness minded as well.  Today we’re presenting an excerpt from the U.S. Army Combat Lifesaver Correspondence Course, IS0871 on making improvised litters. IMPROVISED LITTERS & IMPROVISED LITTER CONSTRUCTION There are times when a casualty may have to be moved and a standard litter, SKED litter, or Talon litter is not available. The distance may be too great for manual carries or the casualty may have an injury that would be aggravated by manual transportation. In these situations, litters can be improvised from materials at hand.  Improvised litters must be as well constructed as possible to avoid the risk of dropping the casualty or further injuring the casualty. Improvised litters are emergency measures and should be replaced by standard litters at the first opportunity. Many different types of litters can be improvised, depending upon materials available. Some are described in the following paragraphs: BLANKET AND POLE LITTER An improvised litter can be made using two tent poles [sticks, etc.] and a blanket. When the casualty is placed on the litter, his weight will hold the litter together.  Steps for improvising such a litter are shown in figure 10-6. Open the blanket and lay it flat on the...

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Andrew’s Note:  Today we present another lesson from our periodic Military Pedagogy series.  This discussion, from TC 21-3, the Soldier’s Handbook for Individual Operations and Survival in Cold Weather Areas [Approved For Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited] is on Carbon Monoxide Poisoning.  As our homes and offices become better insulated and sealed we increase the chances of serious injury or death resulting from carbon monoxide poisoning.  This lesson was written for soldiers living and working in tents and vehicles but applies to permanent shelters as well.  Learn the symptoms, learn the treatment and for heavens sake, learn the prevention of carbon monoxide poisoning. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning  Whenever a stove, fire, gasoline heater, or internal combustion engine is used indoors, there is danger of carbon monoxide poisoning.  Fresh air in living and working quarters is vital.  Carbon monoxide is a deadly, odorless gas. Andrew’s Note:  Additional sources of carbon monoxide poisoning include:  motors (cars, generators, etc.) running in garages attached to living quarters, fireplaces, furnaces, other types of portable heaters, gas stoves/ranges, gas water heaters,  gas refrigerators, wood stoves, barbecue grills, clogged/leaking vent pipes or chimneys, etc. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Prevention The following are suggestions to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning: Use stoves and lanterns in well-ventilated areas and tents. Ensure that stoves and lanterns are functioning properly. Do not let personnel warm themselves by engine exhaust. Always have windows cracked in [stationary, running] vehicles with a heater [or engine is]in use. Use a tent guard [also known as ‘fire guard’…individuals stay awake in shifts to keep the others safe] or shut the stove off when sleeping. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Symptoms Common symptoms are as follows: Headache, dizziness, confusion, yawning, weariness, nausea, and ringing in the ears. Bright red color on lips and skin. Victim may become drowsy and collapse suddenly. If personnel are found unconscious in an enclosed shelter, carbon monoxide poisoning should be suspected. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning...

Ultimate Emergency Medical List – Infographic from The Survival Doctor

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Top 10 Preparedness Uses of Garbage Bags

Today Prepography is pleased to present garbage… garbage bags that is…as in the top 10 preparedness uses of garbage bags.  Garbage bags can be used by preppers for dozens of purposes besides rubbish disposal.  I like the heavy duty, Contractor Grade Garbage Bags because they’re larger and more durable than the typical kitchen variety.  In the Jackson household often buy our heavy duty garbage bags through school fundraisers but they’re also available from the big box and local hardware stores as well as online. Top 10 Preparedness Uses of Trash Bags: Poncho:  It’s not very stylish but there have been a few of times when I’ve used my knife to make a poncho out of a garbage bag in order to stay dry.  Simply cut holes for your head and your arms and you’re ready to go.  Be careful not to cut the holes too large and if the poncho seems too baggy tie a belt or piece of 550 cord around your waist.  This isn’t something you’d want to use in a warm environment because you’d get wet anyway from perspiration but if a garbage bag can get between you and a cold rain it might be worth making such an awful fashion statement. Shelter:  Cutting your garbage bag open (to give you more surface area) and adding it to the top and sides of an improvised shelter like a brush shelter, lean to or fallen tree shelter will make it more weatherproof and offer better insulation.  If you are small enough or your garbage bag is big enough you can also use it to build improvised shelters using the poncho hooch designs I’ve previously presented also using 550 cord.  If you have 100 Mile An Hour Tape (also known as Duct Tape) you could also join two or more garbage bags together to weatherproof your shelter.  Another option is...

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