Endless Sun Solar

Category: Flood

Flood or Storm Surge


Everybody Lives on A Floodplain

Floods are currently hitting parts of central Europe that haven’t been flooded in living memory…and then some.  In fact, the water levels in Passau, Germany have topped the highest recorded flood levels ever recorded there…and that was in 1501.  Just another reminder that you must plan for the unexpected and not put all your eggs in one basket…or preps all in one place. Now I’m not saying that we’re all going to suffer a flood, but your preps may be vulnerable to fire, earthquake, theft, tornado or any manner of other trouble…just don’t let your trouble become a tragedy by relying on one location, stockpile or cache… spread your preps among several locations, enter into a prepper compact with a like minded family that’s lives a distance from you…or both.  Of course if you read the Bible, the Torah or the Qur’an…everybody lives on a floodplain. FacebookPinterestGoogleRedditTwitterTumblrEmailPrintPocketMoreLinkedInLike this:Like...

Hurricane and Flood Safety Tips

Andrew’s Note:  Today Prepography is offering a repost of an article that originally ran on September 2nd, 2012 called Top 10 After the Hurricane or Flood Safety Tips.  This article includes hurricane and flood safety tips for the aftermath of a devastating event like Superstorm Sandy. Hurricanes and floods are dangerous natural disasters.  Once the storm has blown over and the floodwaters have receded dangers still persists.  Here are the Top 10 Hurricane and Flood Safety Tips adapted from the Centers For Disease Control suggestions. 1. Don’t poison yourself or anyone else Apparently after a disaster a lot of folks use equipment they aren’t familiar with to provide electricity, heat or clean up and give themselves carbon monoxide poisoning.  Carbon monoxide is an ordorless and colorless gas put off by many types of combustion engines as well as cooking and heating appliances.  To keep yourself safe read the instruction manual for all your appliances and don’t use equipment like generators, pressure washers, grills, camp stoves, or other gasoline or charcoal burning equipment inside of buildings or within 20 feet of a door, window or vent.  Additionally, don’t leave any vehicles running inside buildings or garages.  Use a carbon monoxide detector with a battery backup (in case the power is out) and leave the house immediately if is sounds or if you feel dizzy, light-headed or nauseated.  Seek immediate medical attention if you suspect poisoning.  See Carbon Monoxide Poisoning After a Disaster  for additional information. 2. Stay out of the floodwaters Don’t reenter the area until floodwaters have receded and there is no rainfall forecast for your area or upstream.  Don’t drive vehicles or equipment through floodwaters and avoid bodily contact with floodwaters due to injury (tripping, lacerations, etc.), drowning, disease and pollution dangers.  Wear a life jacket if there are still floodwaters in the area.  See Flood Waters or Standing Waters ...

Top 10 After the Hurricane or Flood Safety Tips

Hurricanes and floods are dangerous natural disasters.  Once the storm has blown over and the floodwaters have receded dangers still persists.  Here are the Top 10 Safety Tips for After the Hurricane or Flood adapted from the Centers For Disease Control suggestions. 1. Don’t poison yourself or anyone else Apparently after a disaster a lot of folks use equipment they aren’t familiar with to provide electricity, heat or clean up and give themselves carbon monoxide poisoning.  Carbon monoxide is an ordorless and colorless gas put off by many types of combustion engines as well as cooking and heating appliances.  To keep yourself safe read the instruction manual for all your appliances and don’t use equipment like generators, pressure washers, grills, camp stoves, or other gasoline or charcoal burning equipment inside of buildings or within 20 feet of a door, window or vent.  Additionally, don’t leave any vehicles running inside buildings or garages.  Use a carbon monoxide detector with a battery backup (in case the power is out) and leave the house immediately if is sounds or if you feel dizzy, light-headed or nauseated.  Seek immediate medical attention if you suspect poisoning.  See Carbon Monoxide Poisoning After a Disaster  for additional information. 2. Stay out of the floodwaters Don’t reenter the area until floodwaters have receded and there is no rainfall forecast for your area or upstream.  Don’t drive vehicles or equipment through floodwaters and avoid bodily contact with floodwaters due to injury (tripping, lacerations, etc.), drowning, disease and pollution dangers.  Wear a life jacket if there are still floodwaters in the area.  See Flood Waters or Standing Waters  for more information. 3. Watch out for critters, big and small With the multitude of tick and mosquito borne diseases (including a spike in West Nile infections this year) make sure to wear long pants, long-sleeved shirts and insect repellent containing...

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