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Category: Hurricane


Hurricane and Flood Safety Tips

Andrew’s Note:  Today Prepography is offering a repost of an article that originally ran on September 2nd, 2012 called Top 10 After the Hurricane or Flood Safety Tips.  This article includes hurricane and flood safety tips for the aftermath of a devastating event like Superstorm Sandy. Hurricanes and floods are dangerous natural disasters.  Once the storm has blown over and the floodwaters have receded dangers still persists.  Here are the Top 10 Hurricane and Flood Safety Tips adapted from the Centers For Disease Control suggestions. 1. Don’t poison yourself or anyone else Apparently after a disaster a lot of folks use equipment they aren’t familiar with to provide electricity, heat or clean up and give themselves carbon monoxide poisoning.  Carbon monoxide is an ordorless and colorless gas put off by many types of combustion engines as well as cooking and heating appliances.  To keep yourself safe read the instruction manual for all your appliances and don’t use equipment like generators, pressure washers, grills, camp stoves, or other gasoline or charcoal burning equipment inside of buildings or within 20 feet of a door, window or vent.  Additionally, don’t leave any vehicles running inside buildings or garages.  Use a carbon monoxide detector with a battery backup (in case the power is out) and leave the house immediately if is sounds or if you feel dizzy, light-headed or nauseated.  Seek immediate medical attention if you suspect poisoning.  See Carbon Monoxide Poisoning After a Disaster  for additional information. 2. Stay out of the floodwaters Don’t reenter the area until floodwaters have receded and there is no rainfall forecast for your area or upstream.  Don’t drive vehicles or equipment through floodwaters and avoid bodily contact with floodwaters due to injury (tripping, lacerations, etc.), drowning, disease and pollution dangers.  Wear a life jacket if there are still floodwaters in the area.  See Flood Waters or Standing Waters ...

Hurricane Sandy Updates

Keep up to date on Hurricane Sandy with these government and media Hurricane Sandy feeds: BBC Hurricane Sandy Update Page Google Crisismap for Sandy:  You can depict active shelter locations, storm surge forecasting, storm track forecasting, webcams, public alerts, hurricane evacuation routes and traffic conditions National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration StormCentral 2012:  Sandy The Weather Channel Hurricane Tracker:  Sandy   FacebookPinterestGoogleRedditTwitterTumblrEmailPrintPocketMoreLinkedInLike this:Like...

Cooper on Hurricanes – Today’s Quote

Anyone who says they’re not afraid at the time of a hurricane is either a fool or a liar, or a little bit of both. Anderson Cooper FacebookPinterestGoogleRedditTwitterTumblrEmailPrintPocketMoreLinkedInLike this:Like...

Top 10 After the Hurricane or Flood Safety Tips

Hurricanes and floods are dangerous natural disasters.  Once the storm has blown over and the floodwaters have receded dangers still persists.  Here are the Top 10 Safety Tips for After the Hurricane or Flood adapted from the Centers For Disease Control suggestions. 1. Don’t poison yourself or anyone else Apparently after a disaster a lot of folks use equipment they aren’t familiar with to provide electricity, heat or clean up and give themselves carbon monoxide poisoning.  Carbon monoxide is an ordorless and colorless gas put off by many types of combustion engines as well as cooking and heating appliances.  To keep yourself safe read the instruction manual for all your appliances and don’t use equipment like generators, pressure washers, grills, camp stoves, or other gasoline or charcoal burning equipment inside of buildings or within 20 feet of a door, window or vent.  Additionally, don’t leave any vehicles running inside buildings or garages.  Use a carbon monoxide detector with a battery backup (in case the power is out) and leave the house immediately if is sounds or if you feel dizzy, light-headed or nauseated.  Seek immediate medical attention if you suspect poisoning.  See Carbon Monoxide Poisoning After a Disaster  for additional information. 2. Stay out of the floodwaters Don’t reenter the area until floodwaters have receded and there is no rainfall forecast for your area or upstream.  Don’t drive vehicles or equipment through floodwaters and avoid bodily contact with floodwaters due to injury (tripping, lacerations, etc.), drowning, disease and pollution dangers.  Wear a life jacket if there are still floodwaters in the area.  See Flood Waters or Standing Waters  for more information. 3. Watch out for critters, big and small With the multitude of tick and mosquito borne diseases (including a spike in West Nile infections this year) make sure to wear long pants, long-sleeved shirts and insect repellent containing...

Let The Government Handle Your Preparedness?

Why isn’t it wise to trust the gov to do all the prepping for you? Because after spending at least $10 BILLION (yeah with a B!) to restore and upgrade the levees in and around New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, the next “average” hurricane to come along overtops a levee and causes major flooding!  Aside from the sad and infuriating irony of that, it points out that we STILL have to be prepared for emergencies as individuals! FacebookPinterestGoogleRedditTwitterTumblrEmailPrintPocketMoreLinkedInLike this:Like...

Nature’s Fury, Natural Disasters Today

A few stories involving Nature’s Fury currently in the news…Earthquakes & Droughts & Hurricanes & Typhoons, oh my!  Earthquake Swarm “A swarm” of several hundred earthquakes, the strongest measuring a 5.5 magnitude, were centered east of San Diego near California’s border with Mexico on Sunday afternoon but caused little damage, seismologists said. Sunday’s shaking in Southern California’s Imperial Valley was the most activity recorded there since the 1970s, according to U.S. Geological Survey seismologist Lucy Johnson. “We are having a swarm,” Johnson said. “We expect thousands of events (like this) over several days.” via CNN Drought The insurance industry faces its biggest ever loss in agriculture as the worst drought to hit the US in more than half a century devastates the country’s multibillion-dollar corn and soybean crops, triggering large claims. …Agricultural economists at the University of Illinois estimate the drought will trigger this year gross indemnities of roughly $30bn, with an underwriting loss of $18bn. Of that, the US government would shoulder around $14bn, while private sector insurers are likely to face a loss of $4bn, they said. Standard & Poor’s, the rating agency, put the losses of the private sector a notch higher at $5bn. “The US drought is indeed a ‘catastrophic’ event,” Gregory W Locraft, insurance analyst at Morgan Stanley in New York, wrote in a recent note to clients, adding that it “is likely the largest [insurance] crop loss in history.” via CNN Tropical Storm / Hurricane “The best thing to do in a storm like this is get out of its way,” said Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant, who urged residents to prepare for the worst. He, along the governors of Louisiana and Alabama declared states of emergencies to help cope with the storm, which could make landfall near or on the August 29 seventh anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. …A day after slamming Haiti, where...

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