DIY Dehydrated Eggs

DIY Dehydrated Eggs

Why DIY Dehydrated Eggs Is A Good Option

When looking for egg storage solutions, dehydrating eggs at home flies right past many people.  Eggs are one of the most nutritional and versatile foods around. From a remote homestead, to a backyard with a coop, they are easily accessible. Even without refrigeration they can last for weeks and still be edible. By refrigerating eggs that shelf life can be extended by several more weeks, maybe even a couple of months. For longer term storage some people freeze their eggs. By separating the whites and yolks, freezing them separately, eggs can last for up to 6 months. Still, for the long term Prepper that still isn’t an ideal situation. First off, freezing eggs is dependent on the electrical grid. If it goes down you loose refrigeration and the eggs that are dependent upon it. Secondly, 6 months just isn’t long enough. They are looking for solutions that will last for years and should try DIY Dehydrated Eggs.

Dehydrating eggs at home is an easy and viable solution for the Prepper looking for a that length of storage. Most people simply turn to a commercially available product such as those provided by Mountain House and Saratoga Farms. These freeze dried eggs have a shelf life of 30 years. They can be expensive though. For others, this is not an option because they do have their own flock which provide eggs for most of the year. Still, they are looking for a longer term solution as security against the loss of their flock and their egg laying capabilities. For people who can not afford freeze dried eggs or do have their own flocks and are looking to store their extra eggs, dehydrating eggs at home is a good solution.

There are two methods for dehydrating eggs at home.  One method calls for pan scrambling the eggs before dehydrating them.  The other calls for dehydrating beaten uncooked eggs.  After consideration, I rejected the first method.  The reason being that the only thing the first method yields when reconstituted is scrambled eggs.  They can not be used for baking which makes them much less versatile.  Read on to learn how to go about dehydrating eggs at home:

Dehydrating Eggs At Home – Step by Step

Dehydrating Eggs At Home You’ll  need the following:

  • Eggs
  • A Bowl
  • A Whisk
  • A Spatula
  • Dehydrator, with fruit leather trays (not shown)
  • Food Processor, blender or spice grinder (not shown)
  • Storage Container (not shown)
Step 1:  Break the eggs into the bowl.  Use the whisk to thoroughly beat the eggs.  The better you beat the eggs, the better the consistency of the final product.Step 2:  Pour the beaten eggs onto the dehydrator’s fruit leather trays.  In my NESCO Dehydrator, each tray will hold about 4 eggs.  You may have to experiment to see how much yours will hold.  Be sure to place the dehydrator where you are going to use it before filling the tray.  You do not want to move it with full trays or you’ll make a mess.  Additionally, make sure the dehydrator is level to keep your eggs from spilling.  Use the spatula to even out the eggs on the tray. Dehydrating Eggs At Home
 Dehydrating Eggs At Home Step 3:  Set the temperature to 135 degrees Fahrenheit, and dehydrate for 16 to 18 hours.  Once they are done they will form a thin crackled film on the trays.  The surface will also look oily but don’t let that alarm you as it is normal.Step 4:  Take the dehydrated eggs and place them in your food processor, blender, or spice grinder.  Use the pulse function to grind the eggs up into a fine power.  I used a food processor (shown left) to process mine and it did a good enough job but it seems like a spice grinder would be the ideal device for this process.  The color of the egg powder will be a deep yellow (seen below).
 Step 5:  Place the egg powder in an airtight container.  If you have any desiccant packages, you can drop them into the container as well to absorb the moisture.  These eggs should last for up to 5 years without refrigeration and even longer when if kept in the fridge or freezer. Dehydrating Eggs At Home
Dehydrating Eggs At Home

Using the dehydrated eggs

1 Tbsp of Dehydrated Eggs = 1 Egg
To reconstitute the eggs take 1 Tbsp of eggs and place it in a bowl.  Add 2 Tbsp of water to the bowl, and mix well.  Let the mixture sit for 5 to 10 minutes then whisk the eggs.  If you do not ensure the egg is thoroughly whisked, you will end up with a grainy texture in your cooked egg.  If done properly, there will be no difference in the cooked egg.  Seen left is a comparison of a dehydrated egg (on right) and a regular pan scrambled egg (on left).  Note: the color difference is just because I browned the dehydrated egg more than the regular egg.  On my first trial the DIY dehydrated eggs looked exactly like the regular egg. You can use the reconstituted egg for anything you would use a regularly whisked egg for, even baking.

DIY Dehydrated Eggs – A Word Of Caution

Remember when handling the reconstituted eggs that they are still raw eggs.  Salmonella is a real threat if they are not handled properly and food prep items are not thoroughly cleaned.  All safe food handling precautions should be followed both before and after DIY Dehydrated Eggs are reconstituted.

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