Home Made Fire Making Kit -By Grumpy G

Home Made Fire Making Kit -By Grumpy G

After I submitted my article “How To Make Water Proof Matches,” Andrew asked me if I’d be willing to post some pics and descriptions of my home made fire making kit.  I said sure.  So, for your viewing pleasure and critique, here is my

Home Made Fire Making Kit – Contents

Home Made Fire Making Kit  Here is the kit itself.  The plastic container was purchased at Hobby Lobby for $1 USD.  It measures 5.5in x 5.5in x 1.5in, and has a hinged lid.  It is not waterproof; more on that later.
 The next photo shows the kit opened up.  There are 5 compartments, 1 larger center compartment and 4 smaller ones.  I’ve numbered them for ease of identification in this article.# 1 A portion of the strike strip from a box of wooden matches.  I used spray on contact glue to affix it to the inside of the lid. Home Made Fire Making Kit
Home Made Fire Making Kit  #2 60 home made water proof matches.  Click here to read the Prepography pictorial article on how to make them yourself.   They are wrapped in a bit of aluminum foil to keep them from rattling around in the compartment,
 #3 2 tea light candles and the instructions for the magnesium fire started that is in the kit.  The candles came from a bag full of misc candles purchased at a local thrift store.  I needed something to keep them from rattling around in their compartment, so I used the fire starter instructions.  These instructions are made from card stock and folded to take up the extra space and keep the candles quiet.  There’s also an added benefit to including them, not only do they provide instructions for the person who does not know how to use the fire starter…but in a pinch the card board can be used as tinder. fk4
Home Made Fire Making Kit #4 Magnesium fire starter and a length of braided hemp rope.  The fire starter came from Harbor Freight Tools and cost around $3 USD.  It’s not the best one on the market, it does the job, though.  The rope can be used as tinder.  I wrap it around the fire starter to keep it from rattling around.

Andrew’s Note:  Make sure to test your fire starter as there have been reports of counterfeit, non-working models being imported in recent years.  Testing it will take several tries as there is usually a coating or varnish you must get through.

 #5 12 Vaseline covered cotton balls in a snack size Zip-lock bag.  These make great accelerators for starting fires in damp conditions.  Folded up, the bag fits perfectly in it’s compartment.  The cost for this item was negligible, as everything came from the cabinet and pantry. Home Made Fire Kit
Home Made Fire Making Kit  #6 2 lighters and 30in x12in piece of aluminum foil.  One lighter is a Bic Mini ($1 USD).  The other is a light anywhere lighter I got from Survival Life ($4 USD)  It has a steel striker with a cotton wick that fits inside the lighter.  The lighter is filled with butane.  The striker is struck on a magnesium rod that is on the side of the lighter.  It works very well.  In my other fire kits, I have 2 bic lighters.  The aluminum foil can be used for many purposes; gathering water, cooking, signaling, etc.  It also keeps the lighters in place when in the kit.

Home Made Fire Making Kit – Future Improvements

The kit has multiple ways to start a fire when needed, and are usable as they are. There are a couple of improvements I am going to make, though. The first is going to be to add some char cloth to the kit. I need to make it, writing a Prepography How-To article in the process. The second improvement will be to water proof the kit. I am going to do this by taking electrician’s tape and wrapping it around the case, along the seam where the lid and body meet. Not only will this help water proof the kit, but the tape could come in handy in a survival situation.

If you’ve made it this far, let me know what you think. Is there something I missed, or that you would change? Feel free to comment below.

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