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Top 10 Thoughts For Better SHTF Nutrition

Providing better nutrition is always a concern, even in the best of times. In a SHTF scenario, it can literally mean the difference between life and death. Food security/preparedness is one of the 10 tenants of the Full Spectrum Preparedness Doctrine, and providing better nutrition is a key component of that.  In the interests of helping you improve your food preparedness and security through good times and bad, Prepography presents the Top 10 Thoughts for Better SHTF Nutrition: Top 10 Thoughts for Better SHTF Nutrition 1.  Think Chicken & Eggs – It doesn’t matter which came first as Chickens provide the cheapest animal protein, pound for pound, to produce. Their meat is low-fat, and high in nutrients. They also produce eggs, which provide additional nutritional benefits. Chicken meat and eggs can be prepared a variety of ways for consumption and storage. Even egg shells can be boiled and finely ground then added to food for additional protein. 2.  Think With Your Guts – Actually, think about guts.  Liver, kidneys, hearts and even blood are can be very nutritious. Many people turn their noses up at them for a variety of reasons and liver was considered to be dog food until the Great Depression but there are many ways to prepare them to make delicious meals.  One of the axioms in food prepping is that if you don’t eat it normally you won’t eat it in times of crisis so give some of these other protein sources a try with the following recipes. Liver Recipes Kidney Recipes Heart Recipes Cooking with Blood Note: 1. These are ‘good times’ recipes to introduce you these foods which can also be prepared in more austere conditions. 2. Those with certain medical conditions should avoid organ meats. Consult your physician about dietary restrictions for any chronic medical conditions you have. 3.  Think Beans, Peas,...

Sugar Maple Identification – Infographic

With tree tapping season upon us here at The Hermitage I’ve been reading up on sugaring and tree tapping.  We’ve yet to do a real tree census on the retreat and haven’t identified any suitable maple trees yet but have already found a number of trees that can be tapped. I’m going to try tapping one of my Sycamore trees later this week.  In addition to the Maple (Rocky Mountain, Canyon/Big Tooth, Boxelder, Norway, Red, Silver, Black and of course Sugar) and Sycamore trees there are a number of other North American trees that can produce syrup yielding sap including Ironwood, Birch (River, Black, Yellow and Paper), English Walnut, Hazelnut, Black Walnut, Butternut/White Walnut…did I miss any? Anyway, today’s infographic on Sugar Maple Identification is brought to us by Ohio Thoughts… FacebookPinterestGoogleRedditTwitterTumblrEmailPrintPocketMoreLinkedInLike this:Like...

Cogitation – The Woosification Of American Men

A buddy turned me onto the Creek Stewart survivalist show called Fat Guys In The Woods on the Weather Channel.  It’s not exciting, it’s not fancy, it’s not high drama but it is a great show to learn about bushcraft and the woosification of American men. Each episode revolves around three couch potatoes who are stuck in a rut of some form and need to make a change in their life.  Creek’s goal is to help his rotund padawans build self confidence to move forward in their lives outside the woods.  Creek’s approach is similar to that used by Outward Bound but revolves primarily around primitive wilderness skills.  The guys enter the woods and Stewart walks them through shelter building, food acquisition as well as water acquisition and purification.  By the end of their week in the woods the fat guys have developed some basic bushcraft skills which they get to put to the test by striking out on their own for the final day and night. For thousands of years, man lived wild and our triumph over mother nature defined who we were. We were rugged; we were strong and as we evolved our ingenuity led to towering achievements. We secured our place at the top of the food chain and now we have the waistline to prove it… Get off the couch and come out to the woods. Creek Stewart The show seems to go out of their way to pick guys that haven’t spent a lot of time outside or in primitive environments and most of the fat guys seem to rise to the occasion and learn important life lessons but what amazes me is how many of these grown men fall to pieces when it comes time to kill game to eat.  Whatever happened to Dad and Grandpa taking their young men into the woods and teaching them where their...

DIY Dehydrated Eggs

Why DIY Dehydrated Eggs Is A Good Option When looking for egg storage solutions, dehydrating eggs at home flies right past many people.  Eggs are one of the most nutritional and versatile foods around. From a remote homestead, to a backyard with a coop, they are easily accessible. Even without refrigeration they can last for weeks and still be edible. By refrigerating eggs that shelf life can be extended by several more weeks, maybe even a couple of months. For longer term storage some people freeze their eggs. By separating the whites and yolks, freezing them separately, eggs can last for up to 6 months. Still, for the long term Prepper that still isn’t an ideal situation. First off, freezing eggs is dependent on the electrical grid. If it goes down you loose refrigeration and the eggs that are dependent upon it. Secondly, 6 months just isn’t long enough. They are looking for solutions that will last for years and should try DIY Dehydrated Eggs. Dehydrating eggs at home is an easy and viable solution for the Prepper looking for a that length of storage. Most people simply turn to a commercially available product such as those provided by Mountain House and Saratoga Farms. These freeze dried eggs have a shelf life of 30 years. They can be expensive though. For others, this is not an option because they do have their own flock which provide eggs for most of the year. Still, they are looking for a longer term solution as security against the loss of their flock and their egg laying capabilities. For people who can not afford freeze dried eggs or do have their own flocks and are looking to store their extra eggs, dehydrating eggs at home is a good solution. There are two methods for dehydrating eggs at home.  One method calls for pan scrambling the eggs before dehydrating them....

Home Made Fire Making Kit -By Grumpy G

After I submitted my article “How To Make Water Proof Matches,” Andrew asked me if I’d be willing to post some pics and descriptions of my home made fire making kit.  I said sure.  So, for your viewing pleasure and critique, here is my Home Made Fire Making Kit – Contents  Here is the kit itself.  The plastic container was purchased at Hobby Lobby for $1 USD.  It measures 5.5in x 5.5in x 1.5in, and has a hinged lid.  It is not waterproof; more on that later.  The next photo shows the kit opened up.  There are 5 compartments, 1 larger center compartment and 4 smaller ones.  I’ve numbered them for ease of identification in this article.# 1 A portion of the strike strip from a box of wooden matches.  I used spray on contact glue to affix it to the inside of the lid.  #2 60 home made water proof matches.  Click here to read the Prepography pictorial article on how to make them yourself.   They are wrapped in a bit of aluminum foil to keep them from rattling around in the compartment,  #3 2 tea light candles and the instructions for the magnesium fire started that is in the kit.  The candles came from a bag full of misc candles purchased at a local thrift store.  I needed something to keep them from rattling around in their compartment, so I used the fire starter instructions.  These instructions are made from card stock and folded to take up the extra space and keep the candles quiet.  There’s also an added benefit to including them, not only do they provide instructions for the person who does not know how to use the fire starter…but in a pinch the card board can be used as tinder. #4 Magnesium fire starter and a length of braided hemp rope.  The fire starter came from...

7 Spices For Preppers

Spices are an integral part of cooking. Any one who cooks or eats knows how much better food is if it’s properly spiced.  Spices add more than flavor and complexity to foods they can also make a meal healthier or impart medicinal characteristics.  In a survival situation the food you are able to procure may be of lower quality, questionable freshness or maybe just monotonous. Spices can make these borderline foods more palatable and enjoyable.  Many Preppers lay in a good supply of spices in to their food preps but often overlook the health aspect of spices. Beyond sprucing up an other wise bland meal these spices provide additional health benefits. The multiple uses of these spices fit in to the core philosophy of Full Spectrum Preparedness. The listing below of the purported health benefits of spices is not to be considered medical advice and home remedies should not take the place of regular medical care when such care is available. I have scoured the web and compiled a list of 7 spices for preppers to stock up on for their health benefits.  Some of these spices have 10 to 20 known health benefits listed. In the interest of brevity, and sticking to the idea of this being a survival/prepper themed site, I have narrowed the benefits down. I have only listed the top 5 or 6 benefits per spice.  In most cases, these benefits relate directly to a survival situation. For example, many of the spices listed have shown to help prevent cancer. That will still be a concern in a SHTF scenario but it is not one that will be of immediate concern for most.  On the other hand, many of these spices are also reputed to have anti-inflammatory properties. Popping in to the corner drug emporium may not be an option in a crisis situation so let’s learn more about spices as they might...

10 Tips To Winterize Your Garden

Winterizing your garden for winter is a hot topic these days.  In fact there are a slew of on-line articles coming out right on the subject and it is an important step in making sure you have a healthy, vibrant garden come spring time.  The time and effort spent in the late fall/early winter in preparing your garden for winter will pay huge dividends come spring planting and harvest time.  We’ve already had our first hard frost here at Grumpy Acres, so we may be a little late to the party but like the old adage says, though, “better late than never” and we have a unique take that we call the 10 Tips To Winterize Your Garden: 10 Tips To Winterize Your Garden 1) Prune:  Trim back perennial plants, that’s a plant that lives for 2 or more years, to just above the soil with the pruning shears. Pruning back like this promotes a healthier plant come spring time, and improves the appearance of winter beds. Discard or compost the plant refuse. 2) Harvest:  Harvest remaining frost-sensitive vegetables, before the first frost. Eat and store the edible food, and compost or discard the rest.  Unripe tomatoes can be picked ahead of the frost and put in brown paper bags to ripen. 3 ) Pull Up:  Pull up annual vegetable plants from the soil. Remove the entire plant, including the root system. Put healthy plants, which are free of insect infestation in your compost bin. Throw away any plants that have insects or are diseased. 4) Clean Up:  Rake up leaves as part of general yard clean up. Dead and decaying leaves will smother your grass over the winter. By removing them you’ll end up with a healthier, greener lawn come spring time. Add them to your compost pile for use in the spring by your garden or shred them and...

Top 10 Steps To Food Security On A Suburban Lot

Food security, assuring continuous access to quality food,  is an ongoing or rising concern for many people.  Rising food prices, political instability, and the possibility of widespread disruptions to a fragile supply chain are justifiable causes for this concern.  Since a majority of the people on the planet live in or near large metropolitan areas and the suburbs that surround them how does one approach the problem of assuring their family’s food security on a suburban lot? Top 10 Steps To Food Security On A Suburban Lot 1: Plant a Garden One of the easiest and most common way to get started taking control of your family’s food security on your suburban lot is to raise a garden. Gardening is scalable to the size of your lot as well as your abilities. On the small side you can raise edible plants in containers to reduce your food bill. On the larger and more aggressive scale, you can use perma-culture techniques to raise 1,000’s of pounds of food every year in just a quarter acre. Some preppers, gardeners and permaculture enthusiasts have even been able to completely do away with trips to the grocery store for fruits and veggies all together…preparedness is a renewable food supply! Unfortunately many municipalities have regulations limiting the size of gardens or where a garden can be located on your lot.  if that’s the case or you’re just interested in something more aesthetically pleasing check out our second tip…Edible Landscaping. 2: Edible Landscaping Edible landscaping is a permaculture idea that is really taking off. Instead of planting purely decorative plant in flower beds around your home, you can plant edibles. The flowers on many edible plants are just as varied and beautiful as decorative perennials and annuals. The kicker is they produce healthy and nutritious items that go a long way in providing food security on your suburban lot.  Another benefit of edible landscaping...

State Hunting & Fishing License & Regulation Information

Fall has me thinking of hunting and even the government regulations covering hunting are getting so complex that they are confusing… so today we added another resource to Prepography‘s Online Preparedness Tools & Resources Page covering U.S. State Hunting & Fishing License & Regulation Information. Hope this helps you keep your hunting & fishing safe, legal and sane! FacebookPinterestGoogleRedditTwitterTumblrEmailPrintPocketMoreLinkedInLike this:Like...

Aquaponics Infographic

Last summer I ran my own aquaponics system for the first time.  I found that the vegetables within the system grew three times faster than the vegetables from the same seed packs grown outside the system as a control group.  While I didn’t put my system into operation this year because of our move I’m still fascinated by this agricultural growing method and intend on employing aquaponic principals at The Hermitage in future growing seasons…maybe even within an earthship inspired greenhouse.  I came across this great Aquaponics Infographic at Open Source Aquaponics. This infographic does a great job explaining how aquaponics works.  The system I built used an IBC Tote that had previously held soybean oil and featured a growbed that also served as the flood tank. FacebookPinterestGoogleRedditTwitterTumblrEmailPrintPocketMoreLinkedInLike this:Like...

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